Other STDs

Chlamydia

The chlamydia bacteria can cause inflammation in the urethra, the anus and/or the womb. A worrying aspect about chlamydia is that it is by no means always accompanied by discernible complaints, yet it can lead to infertillity in women. Chlamydia can be effectively treated with medication. What’s really important, however, is that if you have complaints, even if you only suspect you might have been infected, you should see a doctor or visit an STD clinic for further examination. There is no vaccine against chlamydia.

Gonorrhoea

Gonorrhoea (colloquially known as “the clap”) is caused by a bacteria, which causes inflammation in the urethra, and if it’s not treated in time it can spread to the ovaries or testicles. As is the case with chlamydia, someone who is infected with gonorrhoea can sometimes have few or even no complaints at all, particularly women. Gonorrhoea can be effectively treated with medication. What’s really important, however, is that if you have complaints, even if you only suspect you might have been infected, you should see a doctor or visit an STD clinic for further examination. There is no vaccine against gonorrhoea.

Viral infections

Herpes and genital warts are caused by a virus. Genital warts often start off small, then grow slowly and spread. They are not painful but they can sometimes itch. And once you’ve been infected with the virus you’ll never be rid of it. It is possible to reduce the complaints, symptoms and danger of contagion with the aid of tablets or ointment.

Syphilis

Syphilis (sometimes known as “the pox”) is caused by a bacteria transmitted through unprotected sexual contact. The disease can run its course without displaying symptoms (or complaints), but in most cases complaints will manifest themselves before too long. What’s more, depending on the stage of the disease, these will worsen.
Syphilis can be effectively treated in all its stages with antibiotics, but it is really important that this is done as soon as possible. Therefore, in alle cases of suspicious symptoms – and even without symptoms – or if you suspect a possible infection, always see a doctor or visit an STD clinic. There is a vaccine against syphilis.