Asia

On the following pages you will find information about the large regions in Asia that we differentiate between when it comes to giving health advice.

  • Central Asia
  • Southern Assia
  • Northern Asia
  • Southeast Asia

Whether you are looking for advice on one specific country in one of these regions, or for a combination of countries that you’ll be visiting on your journey, you are always welcome to drop by for an intake interview.

Central Asia

The health risks on this page pertain to the following countries: Afghanistan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Mongolia, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan and Turkmenistan.

Food and water

The likelihood of running up a food poisoning infection and hepatitis depends to a large extent on the standards of hygiene and sanitation. There is also a risk of contracting typhoid fever.

Insect-born diseases

You can catch malaria in some regions. You can also catch diseases transmitted by tick bites, particularly in the northern regions.

Direct contact

Tuberculosis is widespread and outbreaks of diphtheria and polio are also sometimes reported.

Animals

Rabies is endemic to the whole region, in both wild and domesticated animals.

Fresh surface water

There is a small and local risk of leptospirosis.

Prevention

If you’d prefer tailored advice make an appointment at a Travel Clinic from KLM Health Services.

Southern Asia

The health risks on this page pertain to the following countries: Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, The Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka.

Food and water

The likelihood or running up a food poisoning infection is substantial to very substantial. This also applies to the likelihood of catching hepatitis A and typhoid fever.

Insect-borne diseases

Malaria is endemic to many regions. The occurrence of Dengue varies but it sometimes causes large-scale epidemics. In some regions a prolonged stay in the interior brings with it the risk of contracting Japanese encephalitis.

Direct contact

Tuberculosis is widespread and outbreaks of diphtheria and polio are regularly reported.

Blood and sexual contact

You can contract sexually transmitted diseases here, including hepatitis B and HIV infections. In parts of southern Asia hepatitis B is extremely common among the local population.

Animals

Rabies is very commonplace, in both wild and domesticated animals.

Fresh surface water

There is a risk of catching leptospirosis after contact with fresh surface water (swimming, rafting, etc.).

Prevention

If you’d prefer tailored advice make an appointment at a Travel Clinic from KLM Health Services.

Eastern Asia

The health risks on this page pertain to the following countries: China, Hong Kong, Japan, Macau, Mongolia, North Korea, Taiwan and South Korea.

Food and water

The likelihood of running up a food poisoning infection depends to a large extent on the local circumstances. This also applies to the risk of contracting hepatitis A and typhoid fever.

Insect-borne diseases

You can catch malaria in a number of regions, particularly in the south. The same can be said of Dengue, which can cause epidemics. In some regions a prolonged stay in the interior brings with in the risk of contracting Japanese encephalitis. In some heavily wooded areas diseases spread by ticks pose a hazard.

Direct contact

Tuberculosis is relatively commonplace but the risk varies strongly in the various countries.

Blood and sexual contact

Sexually transmitted diseases, including hepatitis B and HIV infections, are relatively commonplace.

Animals

Rabies is very commonplace, in both wild and domesticated animals. In some countries bird flu is still an issue.

Fresh surface water

In some places fresh surface water (lakes and rivers) is infected with schistosomiasis (bilharzia) and leptospirosis. You can contract these diseases through contact with the infected water (swimming, diving, rafting, etc.).

Prevention

If you’d prefer tailored advice make an appointment at a Travel Clinic from KLM Health Services.

Southeast Asia

The health risks on this page pertain to the following countries: Brunei, Cambodia, The Philippines, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, East Timor, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam.

Food and water

The likelihood of running up a food poisoning infection is substantial to very substantial; this also applies to hepatitis A and typhoid fever.

Insect-borne diseases

You can catch malaria in many regions here. Dengue is also endemic and can cause epidemics. In some regions a prolonged stay in the interior brings with it the risk of contracting Japanese encephalitis.

Direct contact

Tuberculosis is widespread and outbreaks of diphtheria and polio are regularly reported.

Blood and sexual contact

Sexually transmitted diseases, including hepatitis B and HIV infections are relatively commonplace. In some countries in southeast Asia hepatitis B is becoming a folk disease: part of the population act as carriers of the virus, and can therefore pass it on. In some regions HIV is a big problem.

Animals

Rabies is very commonplace, in both wild and domesticated animals. In southeast Asia, particularly Indonesia, bird flu (H5N1) is still an issue.

Fresh surface water

In some places fresh surface water (lakes and rivers) is infected with schistosomiasis (bilharzia) and leptospirosis. You can contract these diseases through contract with the infected water (swimming, diving, rafting, etc.).

Prevention

If you’d prefer tailored advice make an appointment at a Travel Clinic from KLM Health Services.

Northern Asia

The health risks on this page pertain to the following countries: Albania, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Georgia, Hungary, Croatia, Macedonia, Moldavia, Montenegro, Ukraine, Poland, Romania, Russia, Serbia, Slovenia, Slovakia, The Czech Republic and White Russia.

Food and water

The likelihood of running up a food poisoning infection and hepatitis depends to a large extent on the local standards of hygiene and sanitation. For a prolonged stay there is also a significant risk of contracting typhoid fever.

Insect-borne diseases

In a broad band that stretches across Eastern Europe and northern Asia, you can catch diseases spread by ticks. In Russia and Siberia there is a variant that can have serious consequences.

Direct contact

Tuberculosis is widespread and outbreaks of diphtheria and polio are also occasionally reported.

Blood and sexual contact

Sexually transmitted diseases, including hepatitis B and HIV infections are relatively commonplace. In some regions HIV is a problem.

Animals

Rabies is commonplace, in both wild and domesticated animals.

Fresh surface water

There is a local risk of leptospirosis.

Prevention

If you’d prefer tailored advice make an appointment at a Travel Clinic from KLM Health Services.